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Wi-Fi Connected but No Internet on Windows? How to Fix It

A troubleshooting guide for fixing your Internet connection on Windows devices when Wi-Fi is working.

Wi-Fi Connected But No Internet on Windows TechReviewer

Last Updated: October 15, 2021

Written by Brandon Jones

If these troubleshooting tips don't solve your Internet connection problems, you'll likely want to check out these related articles:

Check for Internet Outages in Your Area

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Search Google for "Outage Map" along with the name of your internet service provider, such as Xfinity, CenturyLink, Verizon, or Spectrum.

Move Closer to Your Router

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Wi-Fi has a limited signal distance.

Reducing the distance between your computer and the router might help with the connection.

Even if the Wi-Fi is connected, low signal strength may reduce the bandwidth to appear as though it is not working.

Check Router Connection

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Make sure that your modem is connected to your router and in the correct slot.

Also, ensure that both your router and modem are turned on.

Restart Your Router and Modem

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Start by unplugging your router and modem for 30 seconds.

Plug in the modem and wait for one minute.

Plug in the router.

Wait a few minutes then recheck your connection.

Run Windows Troubleshooter

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Search Windows (Windows Key + S) for Troubleshoot settings then open it.

Click Additional troubleshooters.

Click Internet Connections, then Run the troubleshooter.

Click Troubleshoot my connection to the Internet then follow the steps.

Update Windows

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Make sure to keep your Windows 10 up to date. This will ensure that you have the latest drivers.

To update windows, search Windows (Windows Key + S) for Check for updates, and open it.

Then click the Check for updates button.

Wait for Windows to detect if there are any updates needed. If so, wait for it to install and restart when prompted, then check for updates afterward.

Fully Restart Your Computer

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Windows sometimes comes with "Fast Startup" enabled by default. This can cause Windows updates to not properly install when you shut down your computer.

Shutting down your computer with Fast Reboot enabled doesn't fully shut down your computer; instead it goes into a hibernation state instead.

To fully reboot your computer, open the start menu, then click Power, then Restart.

Update the Wireless Network Adapter

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Search Windows (Windows Key + S) for Device Manager, then open it.

Expand Network adapters by clicking the arrow to the left of it.

Right-click on your wireless adapter (Usually includes the word "Wireless").

Click Update driver and select "Search automatically for updated driver software."

If Windows doesn't find a newer driver automatically, you might have to check manually. You can do this by searching Google for the manufacturer of your device and seeing if there's a new network driver for it. For example, if you have an HP laptop, search for "HP network drivers."

Change Network Settings

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Search Windows (Windows Key + S) for Network Connections, then open it.

Right-click on your network connection, then click Properties.

Click on Internet Protocol Version 6, and then click on Properties.

Select Obtain an IPv6 address automatically and Obtain DNS server address automatically.

Click Advanced then go to the DNS tab.

Uncheck "Register this connection's address in DNS".

Click OK, then OK again.

Recheck your connection.

If it didn't fix it, try these steps again but instead, click on "Internet Protocol Version 4".

Change Prefered Network Band

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Some devices don't support 5GHz or 2.4GHz network bands but still automatically connect to the wrong one.

To change this, first search Windows (Windows Key + S) for Device Manager, then open it.

Expand Network adapters by clicking the arrow to the left of it.

Right-click on your wireless adapter (Usually includes the word "Wireless").

Click Properties, then click on the Advanced tab.

Under the "Property" list, click on Preferred Band.

Under the "Value" dropdown, click either Prefer 2.4GHz band or Prefer 5GHz band. You can try these steps again to try the other Value if the one you choose doesn't work.

Click OK.

Wait for your internet to connect again since it will cut out while these settings take effect.

If it still doesn't work, try either the other option or set the "Value" back to "No Preference."

IP Release, Renew, and Flush DNS

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Search Windows (Windows Key + S) for CMD, then right-click Command Prompt and select Run as administrator. If prompted, select Yes to allow changes to be made to the computer.

Type ipconfig /release in the command prompt and press the Enter/Return key on your keyboard.

Wait a few seconds for that to finish.

Type ipconfig /renew in the command prompt and press the Enter/Return key on your keyboard.

Wait a few seconds for that to finish.

Type ipconfig /flushdns in the command prompt and press the Enter/Return key on your keyboard.

Wait a few seconds for that to finish.

Now restart your computer (Start -> Power -> Restart), then recheck your connection.

Reset TCP/IP

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Search Windows (Windows Key + S) for CMD, then right-click Command Prompt and select Run as administrator. If prompted, select Yes to allow changes to be made to the computer.

Type netsh int ip reset in the command prompt and press the Enter/Return key on your keyboard.

Wait a few seconds for that to finish.

Now restart your computer (Start -> Power -> Restart), then recheck your connection.

Buy a New Router or Modem

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Routers and modems can get outdated, stop working, or become incompatible with new devices. One solution is to buy a new one.

If you're currently renting one from your Internet Service Provider, you can usually ask for a replacement.

With that said, having a router and modem of your own is usually best and allows for more flexibility, lower bills, and better privacy.

Additional Troubleshooting

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If these troubleshooting tips don't solve your Internet connection problems, you'll likely want to check out these related articles: